Greek American

The journey of the first Greek immigrants in 1890 to New York and there lifetime with real photo and video images. How they make the American dream reality and how they love inside there hearts greece

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The story of Greek immigration to the United States actually began much earlier, in 1528, with Don Teodoro Griego’s arrival in Florida. Mass Greek immigration to the United States does not begin until the twentieth century, though. Juan de Fuca made the discovery of the US-Canada strait in 1592 while on an expedition looking for the northern route connecting the Pacific and Atlantic.

With the promise of land, Greek laborers migrated to New Smyrna Beach, Florida, in 1768. Although the original colony was abandoned by 1777, many of the colonists relocated to the nearby city of Saint Augustine and established a prosperous settlement there. The first city in the US where a thriving Greek community was developed is New Orleans, which also boasted the country’s first Greek consulate by 1866.

 

The Great Movement from Europe started in the 1880s when America needed inexpensive manual labor and practical immigration laws encouraged such migration. The last Europeans to immigrate to America during this time were Greeks.

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Greeks were among the last Europeans to emigrate to America during the Great Migration, and they are few in number when compared to Southern European neighbors like Italy. According to figures from the Immigration and Naturalization Services, between 1890 and 1921, 421,000 Greek immigrants arrived in the United States.

The majority of them landed in the industrial Midwest, primarily in Chicago, Detroit, and Pittsburgh, as well as the East Coast, primarily in Florida and New York. On the West Coast, Greeks established enclaves as they worked in the building, lumber, and mining sectors. Anti-immigrant policies put in place at the start of the 20th century, however, led to a decline in Greek immigration to the US for four decades.

Mass Greek immigration began during the same time period as the beginning of American industrialization. Therefore, unlike earlier Hellenic Diasporas in other regions of the world, the vast majority of Greeks began to arrive as a source of inexpensive labor in the 8th century BCE. Greeks experienced prejudice in addition to the demanding requirements and subpar working conditions of manual labor. Greeks were marginalized by racism and kept out of particular occupations and public places, and it fostered unfavorable stereotypes of them. Greek workers continued to engage in political and labor movements for immigrant social justice in the face of such assaults.

greek american subtitle


The story of Greek immigration to the United States actually began much earlier, in 1528, with Don Teodoro Griego’s arrival in Florida. Mass Greek immigration to the United States does not begin until the twentieth century, though. Juan de Fuca made the discovery of the US-Canada strait in 1592 while on an expedition looking for the northern route connecting the Pacific and Atlantic.

With the promise of land, Greek laborers migrated to New Smyrna Beach, Florida, in 1768. Although the original colony was abandoned by 1777, many of the colonists relocated to the nearby city of Saint Augustine and established a prosperous settlement there. The first city in the US where a thriving Greek community was developed is New Orleans, which also boasted the country’s first Greek consulate by 1866.

 

The Great Movement from Europe started in the 1880s when America needed inexpensive manual labor and practical immigration laws encouraged such migration. The last Europeans to immigrate to America during this time were Greeks.

greek american subtitle


Since the first wave of Greek mass immigration to the United States, Greek Americans have historically been centered in New York, which has been the chosen location for initial disembarkation and permanent residence. Greeks, unlike most other European ethnic groups, immigrated to the United States twice on a large scale in the same century, which is a distinctive feature of this wave. During the second wave of mass immigration, Greeks settled in the Astoria neighborhood of Queens, New York, which has been referred to as the largest Greek community outside of Greece or Cyprus.

As the original post-1965 immigrants have attained residence mobility and have left Astoria, the Greek American community of New York is going through a cyclical transition. They have built satellite villages in Queens’ semi-rural surroundings. The Borough of Queens is home to the majority of New York’s Greek population. According to census data, 86% of Americans are native-born, with native-born people of Greek origin somewhat higher at 88%. This demonstrates the group’s evolution and proves that Greeks after 1965 have evolved past the immigrant generation. Greek Americans today are people with an ethnic background.

In every aspect of American society, there are Greek Americans.

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During the European mass immigration period between 1880 and 1924, an influx of nearly twenty million non-Protestant immigrants contributed greatly to the ethnic and religious diversity in the United States.

Historically, in the territory that became the United States, Jewish presence and immigration dates to at least the 1650s. Greek Jews (Romaniotes) did not begin to immigrate to the United States until the early 1900s, following the pattern of their Greek Orthodox compatriots. The immigration of Greek Jews is an integral component of Greek immigration. Their presence in the U.S. diversifies both Greek culture and Jewish faith. They established their first synagogue, Kehila Kenosha Janina, in 1927 in the Lower East Side of Manhattan. They retained their identity, distinct from both Ashkenazi and Sephardic Jews by maintaining the Greek language and conducting religious services in Judeo-Greek.

Romaniote Jews living in New York have a strong attachment to Greece, including visiting Greece. They understand Greek quite well and Greek cuisine and music are embedded in the community. Ethnic attachment is a major indicator of the degree to which members of a group are integrated into the community on three possible levels: culturally, socially, and psychologically. The Romaniote Jews of New York are unique in that they have achieved middle class status through upward social mobility and recent studies document their strong ethnic attachment, embracing Jewish and Greek identities.